Friday, April 14, 2006

NaPoWriMo, day 14: Tornado Alley

Batting 1000 so far on NaPoDoMoHoHoHo, though I've stretched the boundaries of "poem a day" to mean "before I go to bed at night" rather than "by midnight" -- and yesterday's poem was a pathetic three-liner, sort of a lousy faux-haiku.
It's been a terribly stormy spring. I went to bed last night having watched the first few hours' reporting of the tornadoes in Iowa City, was awakened at 4 am by the kitten tugging at my hair because he was frightened by the storm that was blowing in just then. Tonight there are bad storms just north and west of Indianapolis, hail reported up to softball size, tornadoes, et cetera. It all rather gives me flashbacks of the F5 tornado (wind speeds of 261-318 mph) on June 8, 1966 that damaged our house in Topeka, Kansas when I was five years old -- this June it will have been forty years ago. I'm watching the continuous severe-weather coverage on the Indianapolis tv stations right now, just amazed by the radar & other technology -- in 1966 we had only a few minutes' warning and considered ourselves pretty lucky to get that.

Anyway, this weather has certainly found itself reflected in my napowrimo efforts. Last week I wrote a little narrative thingie about a storm chaser; last night I wrote a (bad) radar haiku; and tonight a recurrent character named Sugar has popped into a poem to tell me about some storms she's seen. (Someday I may have a whole chapbook worth of Sugar poems. Maybe. It would be nice.)


[poem fall down go boom. you know the drill.]

2 comments:

Garbo said...

I liked the fact that the little hairs on both her arms were standing up. Seemed spookier that way.

Since the dark power vortex entered the White House, every season brings weirder weather. Not worse, necessarily (it's always been bad) but freakier. Reminds me of the CGI action around the dark wizard standing on his tower in one of the Lord of the Rings movies.

Anne said...

Thanks, Garbo! Yeah, the weather has been freaky for sure. I keep thinking of Deidre McCalla's song "Oh The Earth." "She's gonna stop us, and save herself before she dies."